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Bob Stokoe

Bob Stokoe


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Robert (Bob) Stokoe was born in Mickley on 21st September 1930. A talented centre-half, he signed for Newcastle United in September 1947.

Stokoe made his debut against Middlesbrough on 25th December 1950. He joined a team that included Bobby Cowell, Joe Harvey, Frank Brennan, Jack Fairbrother, Bobby Corbett, Charlie Crowe, Tommy Walker, Alf McMichael, George Hannah, Jackie Milburn, George Robledo and Bobby Mitchell. However, he played in only 9 games that season.

For the next few years Stokoe mainly played in the reserves and was not selected for the FA Cup final wins against Blackpool (1951) and Arsenal (1952). It was not until the 1954-55 season that Stokoe displaced Frank Brennan as the club's centre-half.

Newcastle United had another good FA Cup run in the 1954-55 season, Plymouth Argyle (1-0), Brentford (3-2), Nottingham Forest (2-1), Huddersfield Town (2-0), York City (2-0) to reach the final against Manchester City. Newcastle's star player, Jackie Milburn, later recalled how the game started: "I won a corner on the right and Len White ran over to take it. Manchester City's captain, Roy Paul, was standing next to me as Len placed the ball, but he suddenly yelled, 'Bloody hell, I should be marking Keeble,' so off he darted to find big Vic, who was more widely noted for his prowess in the air. Len fired the ball in my direction and there was I standing all alone like Grey's Monument. I headed the ball past their keeper, Bert Trautmann and that was it."

The situation got worse for City when Jimmy Meadows suffered a serious knee injury in the 18th minute. Just as in 1952 Newcastle had just ten men to beat. Despite this disadvantage City equalized when Bobby Johnstone beat Ronnie Simpson with a diving header after good work from Joe Hayes.

In the second-half Newcastle United made their numerical advantage count. According to Jackie Milburn, the Newcastle captain, Jimmy Scouler, was the best player on the pitch: "Scoular kept spraying great crossfield balls to Bobby Mitchell and between them they tore City apart." Charlie Buchan later commented: "I have never previously seen a wing-half display as good as that of Scoular's in any big game."

In the 53rd minute Bobby Mitchell made a run down the wing before scoring from an acute angle. Soon afterwards George Hannah scored from a pass from Mitchell. Newcastle United had won the FA Cup for the third time in five years and Stokoe had won his first cup winners' medal.

Stokoe was a regular in the Newcastle United team for the next five seasons. He also took over as captain when Jimmy Scouler was unavailable. In February 1961 Stokoe joined Bury as player-manager. He had played in 267 league and cup games for Newcastle.

Stokoe had a long career as manager. This included Bury (1961-65 & 1976-77), Charlton Athletic (1965-1967), Carlisle United (1968-1970, 1980-1983 & 1985-1986), Blackpool (1970-1972 & 1978-79), Sunderland (1972-1976 & 1987-89) and Rochdale (1979–1980). His great success was winning the FA Cup with Sunderland in 1973.

Bob Stokoe died on 1st February, 2004.


Bob Stokoe (1930-2004)

Bob Stokoe transcended traditional North East football rivalries being linked with both Newcastle and Sunderland ! Stokoe was born in Mickley, near Prudhoe on 21st September 1930. He signed as an apprentice with Newcastle United in 1947 and went on to play 261 games for the club, including winning an FA Cup winners medal n 1955. Later his 26 year football management career included managing Blackpool, winning the Anglo-Italian Cup in June 1971. Stokoe managed Sunderland AFC 1972-76, including the clubs famous victory over Leeds in the FA Cup final of 1973 - and had a second spell as manager of Sunderland in 1987. Stokoe died on 1st February 2004, aged 73. Fans of both Newcastle United and Sunderland attended his funeral. A commemorative statue of Stokoe stands outside Sunderland's Stadium of Light.

Robert "Bob" Stokoe (21 September 1930 &ndash 1 February 2004) was an English footballer and manager who was able, almost uniquely, to transcend the traditional north-east rivalry between the region's footballing giants, Newcastle United and Sunderland. As a player he won an FA Cup winner's medal with Newcastle in 1955 and in 1973 was manager of Sunderland in their famous victory over Leeds United.


Ken Jones: Bob Stokoe: a paragon of football's old-fashioned values

Obituaries on Bob Stokoe retold for the thousandth time the tale of Sunderland's remarkable victory over Leeds United in the 1973 FA Cup final barely six months after 10 straight defeats threatened them with relegation from the old Second Division. Chances are they set some readers to musing on the changes that 30 years have wrought in the game of football. Perhaps others read the stories and thought: "It couldn't happen now."

They would be right in that anyway. The uncomplicated influence Stokoe brought to bear on a club that was stumbling towards possible extinction when he was appointed manager late in 1972 brought about one of the game's enduring romances, and in these pressured times are probably beyond emulation.

Besides his devotion to football, another quality that stood out in personal memories of Stokoe when news of his death reached me this week was his unswerving honesty. It is linked to the great satisfaction he took from the 1973 success over and above a triumph against the odds and one of the then most powerful clubs in Europe.

When Stokoe was cutting his teeth in football management at Bury he fell out with Don Revie, who was beginning to shape an outstanding career at Leeds. Facing up to the bleak prospect of relegation, Revie offered Stokoe a sum of money to take things easy in a match at Gigg Lane. Revie was told what he could do with the bribe, and the two men never spoke again. "I'd heard of such things happening but I couldn't believe it was being put to me," Stokoe said one night in the long ago.

The incident was embedded so deep in Stokoe's mind that a number of years later, as manager of Blackpool, he was reluctant to agree a deal with Leeds for a talented Scottish international inside-forward Tony Green, who eventually joined Newcastle United. "I tried to get Liverpool interested," he told me. "When Bill Shankly asked me why I was set against the offer from Leeds I told him about the thing with Revie at Bury. Bill went silent. I don't think he ever again saw Revie in the same light."

I could only take Stokoe's word for this but matters moved on when allegations of bribery, mainly involving a match against Wolverhampton Wanderers, were levelled at Leeds in 1973, leading to a probe by the Daily Mirror whose hard-bitten investigative team sought my assistance on the basis of what they assumed to be a friendship with Revie. As an employee of the Sunday Mirror I was obliged to give the investigators some time but I chose not to pass on things I had been told. One of their questions concerned Stokoe's feelings about Revie, another the 4-0 victory Leeds suspiciously gained at Sunderland a few days after failing to enlist his co-operation at Bury.

Revie successfully brought a legal action against the Mirror and none of the Leeds players of that time have ever given any credence to the notion that their manager was involved in match-fixing. Whether Stokoe helped to instigate suspicions about Revie has never been clear. At least, it isn't something to which he ever publicly admitted.

In many ways, the very best of ways, Stokoe was an old-fashioned football man who trod the line between toughness and sentimentality. A Newcastle player between 1947 and 1961, their centre-half in the 1955 FA Cup success against Manchester City (Revie was in direct opposition), he managed six different clubs, including Charlton Athletic, Blackpool, Rochdale and Carlisle United. At Charlton he missed a game due to the death of his dog. Along with poor results, it led to his dismissal immediately after a defeat at Crystal Palace. "The business with the dog was bound to work against you," I remember saying. "It's the way I am," he replied.

One of the most revealing things about Stokoe was his competitive nature. Essentially a private man who strove, and not always successfully, to keep his emotions in check, he hated losing. Contemporaries at Newcastle recalled occasional outbursts of volcanic temper. He is famous, of course for sprinting across the pitch at Wembley, a trilby on his head, raincoat flapping to embrace Sunderland's goalkeeper Jim Montgomery, whose sensational double-save had broken Leeds's spirit.

In becoming one of a handful to win the FA Cup as both a player and manager, in making a fairy tale come true, Stokoe had established himself in the lore of the game. It was fashioned out of those faded sentiments, honesty, loyalty and pride.


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Sadly, this is a another dubious "biography" from Paul Harrison. This is the third football "biography" he has published (See Black Flash and Keep Fightinhg where the subject has been long deceased, and yet Harrison has managed to sit on these "exclusive" interviews until long after the subject's death.

The book is littered with errors, is poorly written, and suffers from the author's complete lack of any other discernible research into Stokoe's life and career. Page after page of this book is filled with what are supposed to be Stokoe's own words, yet we learn nothing of his life and career that hadn't been already published elsewhere. It’s very difficult to determine if these are genuine quotes or not, and raises many questions.

The author has since been exposed for writing fake interviews with serial killers, so perhaps that explains this book too.


Bob Stokoe

Bob Stokoe (21. syyskuuta 1930 – 1. helmikuuta 2004) on englantilainen jalkapalloilija ja valmentaja. Hän voitti FA Cupin pelaajana Newcastle Unitedissa ja valmentajana Sunderlandissa.

Pääasiassa puolustajana pelannut Stokoe siirtyi paikallisesta pikkuseurasta Newcastle Unitediin 1947. Hän teki debyyttinsä edustusjoukkueessa 1950. Stokoe pelasi Newcastlessa kaikkiaan 287 ottelua ja suurimpana saavutuksenaan voitti FA Cupin 1955. Vuonna 1961 Stokoe siirtyi Buryyn, jossa hän toimi pelaamisen ohella myös valmennustehtävissä. Stokoe pelasi seurassa 81 ottelua kunnes päätti pelaajauransa. [1]

Vuonna 1965 Stokoe valittiin Charlton Athleticin päävalmentajaksi. Charltonin jälkeen hän valmensi Rochdalea, Carlisle Unitedia ja Blackpoolia. Blackpoolin Stokoe johdatti kahdesti Coppa Anglo-Italianan loppuotteluun, joista toisen se voitti ja toisen hävisi. Vuonna 1972 Stokoe valittiin 2. divisioonassa pelanneen Sunderlandin päävalmentajaksi. Stokoe onnistui kääntämään vaikeuksissa olleen seuran kurssin ja FA Cupissa Sunderland eteni yllättäen loppuotteluun. Finaalissa pääsarjan Leeds United oli ylivoimainen ennakkosuosikki, mutta Sunderland voitti ottelun 1–0 ensimmäisenä alemman sarjatason seurana yli 40 vuoteen. Stokoe onnistui nostamaan Sunderlandin 1. divisioonaan 1976, mutta erosi kun seuraava kausi alkoi surkeasti. Sunderlandin jälkeen Stokoe valmensi uudelleen Buryä, Blackpoolia, Rochdalea ja Carlisle Unitedia. Viimeisenä valmennuspestinään Stokoe toimi Sunderlandin väliaikaisena päävalmentajana 1987. Uransa päättyessä Stokoe oli liigassa pisimpään toiminut päävalmentaja. [1] [2]

Stokoe kuoli vuonna 2004 73-vuotiaana sairastettuaan useita vuosia dementiaa. [2]


Death

After being unwell for some time, Stokoe was admitted to hospital in Hartlepool suffering from pneumonia and died on 1 February 2004 aged 73. The respect offered by both rival fan groups of Newcastle United and Sunderland was marked by their attendance at his funeral at the crematorium at Newcastle upon Tyne. The Reverend Neil Cockling, the Methodist Minister for Prudhoe, who conducted the service, told mourners: "He will be remembered by all as a real gentleman. Such was Bob’s standing that we can see Sunderland and Newcastle here together today to celebrate his life."


Please stick with me as I indulge myself with one of the other loves of my life, Sunderland AFC, who play their football (soccer) in the English Premier League.

Today I start at the beginning of a photo story showing some of the fans and peripherals around a game at the 48,800 seater Stadium of Light, all the pictures were taken on Saturday 20th. March 2010 when Sunderland defeated Birmingham City by a 3 - 1 scoreline. Unfortunately I won't be showing pictures from inside the stadium during the game because of some weird image copyrights held by the club and the Premier League.

South Shields lies in between Sunderland and Newcastle and the football fans here are evenly split between the north-east's two major teams, I've followed Sunderland since I was a very young boy and have experienced both joy and heartbreak as a result.

Bob Stokoe was an absolute legend in the north-east of England, having played football for our bitter rivals Newcastle United he forged his managerial career in the clubs of the lower divisions including Carlisle before arriving at Sunderland in 1972 when our fortunes were low. Sunderland were a 2nd. Division side then and under his management he took the club to Wembley in 1973 where we beat Leeds United, who were without doubt England's best team of the time, in a legendary FA Cup Final. The statue erected in his honour after his death depicts the unforgettable moment at the end of that cup final when Bob (the Messiah) raced onto the Wembley turf to embrace goalkeeper Jimmy Montgomery who had pulled off one of history's greatest ever double saves that prevented Leeds from scoring.

Bob was well regarded and was a real gentleman.

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Bob Stokoe, The Messiah

On the 47th anniversary of Sunderland’s heroic and iconic 1973 Wembley FA Cup triumph Ryehill Football thought it appropriate to remember the man indelibly linked with that run and ultimate success. Whilst one of the abiding memories of the run to Wembley came after the semi final win at Hillsborough where Stokoe came out to salute the crowd, and make his now legendary statement, it is perhaps fitting to leave the ultimate accolade to two of British football’s most revered writers, who wrote the following obituaries following Stokoe’s death in 2004.

Brian Glanville, Tuesday February 3, 2004

Think of Bob Stokoe, who has died aged 73, and an indelible image comes to mind. It is Wembley in May 1973. Against all the odds and expectations, Second Divison Sunderland have just beaten mighty Leeds United 1-0 in the FA Cup Final, and on to the pitch, overcome by irrepressible joy, runs Stokoe, in his familiar trilby hat. He had many satisfactions in his long career as the Newcastle United centre-half, and manager of a string of clubs, but this surely was the high point.

Stokoe was born at Mickley, Northumberland, and joined nearby Newcastle. He made his debut as a centre-forward against Middlesbrough – he was an emergency choice – on Christmas Day 1950. Standing just under 6ft and weighing just over 11st, he was no giant, but prevailed with his quick anticipation and prowess in the air. Altogether he made 288 appearances for Newcastle.

For a time, he was switched to right-half, but it was at centre-half that he won an FA Cup Final medal of his own, when, having succeeded the big Scottish international Frank Brennan in that role, he was a member of the Newcastle team that beat Manchester City 3-1 in 1955.

After that, Stokoe had a spell with Hartlepool, before beginning his long managerial career at Bury. There he stayed from 1961 to 1965, scorning, as he once revealed, the offer of a bribe from the late Don Revie, then the Leeds United manager, to lose a match.

He then went south to manage Charlton Athletic (1965-67), with limited success. He had three spells in charge of Carlisle United (1968-70, 1980-83 and 1985-86). In between, Blackpool appointed him in 1970, and he took the club to two Anglo-Italian cup final games in 1971 (where they beat Bologna 2-1) and 1972 (where they lost to Roma 3-1). Two years later, he became manager of Sunderland, a job he held until 1976.

Sunderland’s victory in that 1973 final made them the first Second Division team to win the trophy since West Bromwich Albion in 1931, but their achievement was much the more remarkable. Not only were they facing a Leeds team that had dominated English football with its galaxy of stars, but where West Bromwich had been about to rejoin the First Division, Sunderland rose to victory from deep in the Second Division. It was their first FA Cup triumph since 1937, when they beat Preston North End.

One of the ironies of the match was that the Sunderland goalkeeper, Jim Montgomery, who could seldom have handled the ball so ineptly, was destined to make one of the finest saves ever seen in a Cup Final. This when a ferocious shot, close in, from the formidable right foot of Leeds’s Scottish international right-winger Peter Lorimer was somehow turned by Montgomery on to the Sunderland bar.

Territorially, and perhaps inevitably, Leeds had much the better of the exchanges, but it was to Stokoe’s credit that Sunderland showed such uncompromising grit. Oddly enough, it was what seemed to be an error by little Bobby Kerr, the Sunderland midfielder, which led to the goal.

Electing to shoot from 30 yards, rather than pass to the unmarked Vic Halom on his right, he saw the Leeds keeper, Harvey, cautiously turn the ball over the bar. Hughes took the corner, Halom flicked the ball on, and with the Leeds defence in confusion, Ian Porterfield calmly brought it down and scored with his supposedly weaker right foot.

In the 1975-76 season, Sunderland won the Second Division title with 56 points and returned to the top division. Stokoe managed Rochdale in the 1979-80 season, before his final years at Carlisle.

He had been suffering from senile dementia for several years. His wife Joan predeceased him

Robert Stokoe, footballer and manager, born 1930 died February 1 2004

By Ken Jones, The Independent

“Obituaries on Bob Stokoe retold for the thousandth time the tale of Sunderland’s remarkable victory over Leeds United in the 1973 FA Cup final barely six months after 10 straight defeats threatened them with relegation from the old Second Division. Chances are they set some readers to musing on the changes that 30 years have wrought in the game of football. Perhaps others read the stories and thought: “It couldn’t happen now.”

They would be right in that anyway. The uncomplicated influence Stokoe brought to bear on a club that was stumbling towards possible extinction when he was appointed manager late in 1972 brought about one of the game’s enduring romances, and in these pressured times are probably beyond emulation.

Besides his devotion to football, another quality that stood out in personal memories of Stokoe when news of his death reached me this week was his unswerving honesty. It is linked to the great satisfaction he took from the 1973 success over and above a triumph against the odds and one of the then most powerful clubs in Europe.

When Stokoe was cutting his teeth in football management at Bury he fell out with Don Revie, who was beginning to shape an outstanding career at Leeds. Facing up to the bleak prospect of relegation, Revie offered Stokoe a sum of money to take things easy in a match at Gigg Lane. Revie was told what he could do with the bribe, and the two men never spoke again. “I’d heard of such things happening but I couldn’t believe it was being put to me,” Stokoe said one night in the long ago.

The incident was embedded so deep in Stokoe’s mind that a number of years later, as manager of Blackpool, he was reluctant to agree a deal with Leeds for a talented Scottish international inside-forward Tony Green, who eventually joined Newcastle United. “I tried to get Liverpool interested,” he told me. “When Bill Shankly asked me why I was set against the offer from Leeds I told him about the thing with Revie at Bury. Bill went silent. I don’t think he ever again saw Revie in the same light.”

I could only take Stokoe’s word for this but matters moved on when allegations of bribery, mainly involving a match against Wolverhampton Wanderers, were levelled at Leeds in 1973, leading to a probe by the Daily Mirror whose hard-bitten investigative team sought my assistance on the basis of what they assumed to be a friendship with Revie. As an employee of the Sunday Mirror I was obliged to give the investigators some time but I chose not to pass on things I had been told. One of their questions concerned Stokoe’s feelings about Revie, another the 4-0 victory Leeds suspiciously gained at Sunderland a few days after failing to enlist his co-operation at Bury.

Revie successfully brought a legal action against the Mirror and none of the Leeds players of that time have ever given any credence to the notion that their manager was involved in match-fixing. Whether Stokoe helped to instigate suspicions about Revie has never been clear. At least, it isn’t something to which he ever publicly admitted.

In many ways, the very best of ways, Stokoe was an old-fashioned football man who trod the line between toughness and sentimentality. A Newcastle player between 1947 and 1961, their centre-half in the 1955 FA Cup success against Manchester City (Revie was in direct opposition), he managed six different clubs, including Charlton Athletic, Blackpool, Rochdale and Carlisle United. At Charlton he missed a game due to the death of his dog. Along with poor results, it led to his dismissal immediately after a defeat at Crystal Palace. “The business with the dog was bound to work against you,” I remember saying. “It’s the way I am,” he replied.

One of the most revealing things about Stokoe was his competitive nature. Essentially a private man who strove, and not always successfully, to keep his emotions in check, he hated losing. Contemporaries at Newcastle recalled occasional outbursts of volcanic temper. He is famous, of course for sprinting across the pitch at Wembley, a trilby on his head, raincoat flapping to embrace Sunderland’s goalkeeper Jim Montgomery, whose sensational double-save had broken Leeds’s spirit.

In becoming one of a handful to win the FA Cup as both a player and manager, in making a fairy tale come true, Stokoe had established himself in the lore of the game. It was fashioned out of those faded sentiments, honesty, loyalty and pride. ”

Personal Memories

Personally I would like to indulge in two memories of Stokoe in my own time supporting Sunderland. The first was not actually of Stokoe himself but of a silk scarf and banner that I used to have with “Stokoe’s Stars” written on it. I remember after our win against Bolton Wanderers on Easter Monday in 1976, that won us promotion, that I went home and hung my banner outside my bedroom for everyone too see. That was an emotional day and my first promotion with SAFC.

The second was at Bradford City when Stokoe made his return to the club following the dismissal of MacMenemy, with relegation to the third division staring us in the face. The anticipation of Stokoe coming out once more to greet the fans was overwhelming and when he appeared, to the delight of the travelling Roker Roar, the emotion got too much for many of us, including me. Alas it wasn’t to be and a second coming resulted in the unthinkable, despite Stokoe’s best efforts.

Of course a statue to Stokoe was placed outside the South Stand at The Stadium Of Light and now serves a host of purposes as a meeting point for our supporters, a reminder of a very special time in the history of the club and also as a sign of what once was and could be again.

Lets remember what Stokoe once said – “I didn’t bring the magic, it’s always been here… I just came back to find it.”


Bob Stokoe Manager Statistics

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Tag Archives: Bob Stokoe

Mackems not enjoying Wembley – yet again


I’ve never had much time for Sunderland , despite the fact that the Wearside club have never featured among the top echelons of rivalry with my beloved Leeds United . And really, how could they – when their sole claim to fame since the war amounts to one distinctly fluky Wembley success against Don Revie ‘s overwhelming FA Cup Final favourites in 1973?

The thing is, though, that while Leeds United have generally had bigger fish to fry, the barren nature of Sunderland’s last three quarters of a century has meant that they’ve had to harp on and on about Stokoe, Porterfield, Montgomery et al ever since that freak cup final, which found Leeds well short of their normal imperious form, while Sunderland rode their luck into a page of history. It was a major shock, alright – bigger than Southampton ‘s success against the Pride of Devon in 1976, and much bigger than the Crazy Gang beating the Culture Club in 1988. And, naturally, the Leeds hating media waste no opportunity to rub our collective nose in what was really a day of humiliation for a club of United’s historic standing. But them’s the breaks, and we’ve had to live with that embarrasment ever since, just as Sunderland’s needy fan base have found it a straw to clutch at for nigh on 47 years.

There are compensations, though, and Netflix came up with a beauty just this week, screening the second series of S underland Till I Die , which features the Mackems in familiar self-destruct mode, contriving to lose not one, but two Wembley finals as the 2018/19 season reached its climax. That’s funny enough, but the fact that this serial disaster of a club gave their fans some false hope in both matches, contriving to take the lead before capitulating, raised the comedic levels to sublime. And the nature of the Wembley occasions is also rather funny, a Checkatrade Final (whatever that is) against Portsmouth, followed by the League One play-off against Charlton Athletic , managed by our old alumnus Lee Bowyer . In both games the Mackems were ahead, prompting feverish celebrations among their hopeful but dim support – and in both games, Sunderland lost at the last gasp, on penalties against Pompey and in the very last minute of injury time against Charlton. Just as the so-called Roker Roar dissolved into tears, so Leeds United fans with long enough memories had tears of mirth rolling down cheeks that ached with laughter. It was a double dose of Schadenfreude at the time, making up in some small degree for our own less than successful climax to last season – and now Netflix have produced a comedy epic out of the ashes of Mackem hopes, almost as if they wished to entertain us Whites all over again.

This double HA9 disaster was actually made up of the two most recent helpings of Wembley Karma for Sunderland, who have contrived to lose every single Wembley appearance since 1973, including another play off defeat to Charlton in 1998, on penalties, which is always a gratifyingly painful way to get beat for any club that you don’t particularly like. Towards the end of the Netflix Laughter Show, a tearful Mackem lady is showing sobbing “Why isn’t it ever us?” in response to their latest Wembley surrender. I’ll tell you why, love. It’s payback for 1973 and that git Stokoe prancing across the Wembley pitch to hug that git Montgomery. Lovely stuff, thank you Netflix and I shall look forward to the next series of this laughter-strewn classic.

As I said earlier, it’s not a full blown rivalry, and I wouldn’t want anyone to get me wrong on this. My negative feelings about Sunderland have more to do with their intrinsic lack of charm, than any real feeling of competitive dislike. The fact that they’ve been paying in installments of misery for the joy they felt on that long ago Wembley day simply makes me feel justified in celebrating their decades of unhappiness – it’s as if they’ve suffered all that pain and angst just for us. Which is most kind of them, when you think about it. And revelling in their last two disastrous seasons has certainly provided me with plenty of chuckles and entertainment during this annoying hiatus in the current campaign. In fact, it’s put me in such a good mood that I think I’ll nip off downstairs and watch Manchester United 1, Manchester City 6, and give my chorlte muscles another brisk workout.


Watch the video: 1973 FA Cup Final Sunderland v Leeds United (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Dontae

    always pzhalsta ...

  2. Fezahn

    HERE NOT REFERENCE

  3. Pippin

    It is true! I like this idea, I fully agree with you.

  4. Demogorgon

    Yeah ... Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance, you have to move.



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